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Prevention Tips for Breast Cancer

by Lux Joseph 5. October 2014

Every 2 minutes, there is a new breast cancer diagnosis.

Every 14 minutes, a life is lost to the disease.

Over 40,000 people will die this year; about 400 of them will be men.

85% of all diagnoses have no family history.

1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women between ages 40 and 55.

Cancer takes a toll on communities across the United States. It’s a complex disease that affects people in each city, town, and neighborhood differently. Prevention is the best way to fight cancer. This means getting people to do things that will protect their health—like get screened, quit smoking, and exercise more. It also means bringing together local leaders to support local cancer prevention efforts.

This October, Commercial Medical Escorts (CME) is proud to participate in National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast cancer is the second most common kind of cancer in women. About 1 in 8 women born today in the United States will get breast cancer at some point. The good news is that many women can survive breast cancer if it’s found and treated early.

 

·       If you are a woman age 40 to 49, talk with your doctor about when to start getting mammograms and how often to get them.

·       If you are a woman age 50 to 74, be sure to get a mammogram every 2 years.

 

You may also choose to get them more often.

Talk to a doctor about your risk for breast cancer, especially if a close family member of yours has had breast or ovarian cancer. Your doctor can help you decide when and how often to get mammograms.

CME will be sharing with you tools and tips to protect your health this October. It is important to be proactive when it comes to your well being and staying healthy. This week CME is going to focus on tips to help you prevent breast cancer. While most marketing and publicity focuses around women getting breast cancer, keep in mind it can also occur in men.

1. Schedule your well-woman visit with a doctor or nurse every year. The well-woman visit is an important way to help you stay healthy. Well-woman visits include a full checkup, separate from any other visit for sickness or injury. These visits focus on preventive care for women, which may include:

·       Services, like shots, that improve your health by preventing diseases and other health problems

·       Screenings, which are medical tests to check for diseases early when they may be easier to treat

·       Education and counseling to help you make informed health decisions

2. Stay at a healthy weight. Being overweight has many negative consequences for health, and the risk of breast cancer is one of them. The effect of weight is dramatic. Obesity raises the risk of breast cancer after menopause, the time of life when breast cancer most often occurs. Strive to keep your body mass index (BMI) under 25. Breast cancer is often detected at a later stage in obese women, and obese women are more likely to die from breast cancer.

3. Eat healthy to avoid tipping the scale. Embrace a diet high in vegetables and fruit and low in sugared drinks, refined carbohydrates and fatty foods. Eat lean protein such as fish or chicken breast and eat red meat in moderation, if at all. Eat whole grains. Choose vegetable oils over animal fats.

4. Keep physically active. Research suggests that increased physical activity, even when begun later in life, reduces overall breast-cancer risk by about 10 percent to 30 percent. All it takes is moderate exercise like a 30-minute walk five days a week to get this protective effect.

5. Drink little or no alcohol. Alcohol use is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Women should limit intake to no more than one drink per day, regardless of the type of alcohol.

6. Don’t smoke. Research suggests that long-term smoking is associated with increased risk of breast cancer in some women.

7. If you bear children, breast-feed your babies for as long as possible. Women who breast-feed their babies for at least a year in total have a reduced risk of developing breast cancer later.

8. Avoid hormone replacement therapy. Menopausal hormone therapy increases risk for breast cancer. If you must take hormones to manage menopausal symptoms, avoid those that contain progesterone and limit their use to less than three years. “Bioidentical hormones” and hormonal creams and gels are no safer than prescription hormones and should also be avoided.

9. Consume a diet low in animal-based products. Animal-based products are extremely inflammatory and expose the body to a high dose of arachidonic acid, an inflammatory mediator. Fill half your plate with veggies or even consider a vegan-based diet. 

10. Dedicate at least 8 hours to sleep. A study published in August 2012 showed an association between less sleep and development of aggressive forms of breast cancers in women. If you suffer from chronic sleep issues, work with your physician to find the underlying cause and correct it. Using drugs isn't the answer!
Should you have any additional questions, please consult your physician. Some tips and resources are from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) and we encourage you to visit their website. Throughout the month we will share additional tips and resources to keep you staying health.

 

 

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month


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